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Sehr bewegt von einem Artikel von Jon Bloom, möchte ich diesen hier teilen:

Troubled But Not Troubled

von Desiring God Blog – Desiring God von Jon Bloom

Original

Jesus’ words “let not your hearts be troubled” (John 14:1a) are comforting. But this it is not merely counsel. It is a command. What Jesus is saying is that in the face of trouble—terrible trouble—we must not allow our hearts to be troubled.

How is that even possible?

Jesus’ answer: “Believe in God; believe also in me” (John 14:1b).

When Jesus spoke these words, he had just informed the disciples that one of them would betray him and Peter would deny him that night. On top of that he said he was going away. He meant death and later ascension. This was very troubling news. But it was not to trouble them.  Why? Because Jesus’ promise was that their brief sorrow would turn into indestructible joy (John 16:20-22).

A Promise For You and Me

Jesus promises this to you and me today. Tribulation will come, but he has overcome the world (John 16:33). Every thing is literally going to be all right for those who believe in him.

Like Jesus in the boat with his disciples when the storm hit, trouble usually has the appearance of being in control. But just because we can’t control trouble does not mean trouble is in control. Jesus is in control and he’s in the boat with us.

Believing this completely changes the way we see the storm. It is the key to not being troubled by trouble.

That’s why Christians are called “believers.” “We walk by faith, not by sight” (2 Corinthians 5:7). We don’t trust appearances, no matter how compelling they look today. We trust God’s promises, no matter how unlikely to be fulfilled they appear today.

Obey Jesus’ comforting command: “Let not your hearts be troubled. Believe in God; believe also in me” (John 14:1).

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This article is copied from http://www.desiringgod.org/blog/posts/troubled-but-not-troubled – if you want to use it, refer to this page, please.

Ich habe überlegt, wie man diesen Artikel übersetzen könnte; und denke die Wortwahl im Deutschen wäre „Bekümmert und doch nicht bekümmert“. Von vielen Dingen werden wir bekümmert, aber wir sollen nicht bekümmert sein. Der Grund (worauf wir bauen) ist: Glaubt an Gott und glaubt an mich! Amen!

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Dieser Eintrag wurde veröffentlicht am 5. März 2011 von in Bloggerszene und getaggt mit , .

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